BRADWELL s a quiet village, and has been a special place from Roman times to today.
With peaceful walks and a smugglers' pub just minutes away, you could not ask for a more relaxing spot. Nearby St. Peters Chapel is said to be the oldest church in Essex.

Navigational Information

Craft approaching the seaward should leave the remains of the

‘Baffles’ off Bradwell Nuclear Power Station to Port, and the

North Cardinal marking the spit at the northern end of ‘Pewitt

Island’ which shows a quick flashing white light, and the ‘Tide

Guage’ to starboard.

The Tide Guage shows the maximum depth in Bradwell Creek in

feet. There is no bar, the Creek being roughly level from the

Beacon to the Marina entrance.

The Creek is marked with red can to port and withies to

starboard. The deeper water is found centrally between the cans

and withies.

Triangular topped leading marks are in place on shore and a

green conical bouy. The deeper water after rounding this is to

the shore side of most boats, other than the small sailing

dinghies belonging to Bradwell Sailing Centre.

The end of ‘A’ and ‘B’ pontoons are kept clear for visiting yachts

and a notice requesting them to report to the tower to be

allocated an overnight berth is posted there. The Marina is

dredged to a depth lower than that of the creek so boats remain

afloat at all times.

A listening watch is kept on VHF channel 37 or 80 during the day,

but try channel 37 after hours.

© Bradwell Marina 2016
Essex’s premier marina on the beautiful Blackwater Estuary
© Bradwell Marina 2016

Navigational Information

Craft approaching the seaward should leave the remains of the

‘Baffles’ off Bradwell Nuclear Power Station to Port, and the

North Cardinal marking the spit at the northern end of ‘Pewitt

Island’ which shows a quick flashing white light, and the ‘Tide

Guage’ to starboard.

The Tide Guage shows the maximum depth in Bradwell Creek in

feet. There is no bar, the Creek being roughly level from the

Beacon to the Marina entrance.

The Creek is marked with red can to port and withies to

starboard. The deeper water is found centrally between the cans

and withies.

Triangular topped leading marks are in place on shore and a

green conical bouy. The deeper water after rounding this is to

the shore side of most boats, other than the small sailing

dinghies belonging to Bradwell Sailing Centre.

The end of ‘A’ and ‘B’ pontoons are kept clear for visiting yachts

and a notice requesting them to report to the tower to be

allocated an overnight berth is posted there. The Marina is

dredged to a depth lower than that of the creek so boats remain

afloat at all times.

A listening watch is kept on VHF channel 37 or 80 during the day,

but try channel 37 after hours.